Half of CA children have immigrant parents

Immigrant child and mother holding handsSweeping changes to federal immigration policy could have a disproportionate effect on California, where 50 percent of children have at least one immigrant parent, compared to 25 percent nationwide, according to the latest data available on Kidsdata. That translates to 4.5 million children in California alone. In congressional districts 17, 34 and 46, which represent parts of greater Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, more than 75 percent of children have at least one immigrant parent.

In 2013, California passed immigration legislation to address disparities between immigrant and non-immigrant families. California also offers some benefits to undocumented immigrant children that would not be available under federal law, including Medi-Cal, post-secondary financial aid, and domestic worker protections for their parents. Additionally, the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, introduced in 2012, was viewed as important temporary relief from deportation, expanding the socioeconomic mobility and trajectories for eligible youth. Under the new administration, the future of the DACA program is uncertain.

For mixed-immigration-status families, family separation poses serious risks for children, including emotional trauma, housing insecurity and food insecurity. Immigration policies must not lose sight of the well being of children and their families.

Related Data

Immigrants (Summary)

Children Living in Linguistically Isolated Households

Children Living with One or More Foreign-Born Parent

Foreign-Born Population, by Age Group

Race or National Origin as Reason for Bullying/Harassment

Public School Enrollment, by Race/Ethnicity

English Learners in Public Schools

Helpful Links

Immigrant-Inclusive State and Local Policies Move Ahead in 2014-15 (PDF), National Immigration Law Center

The Educational, Psychological, and Social Impact of Discrimination on the Immigrant Child, Migration Policy Institute

National Council of La Raza

Asian Pacific Islander (API) Population Report: In Our Own Words, California Dept. of Public Health, Office Of Health Equity

Urban Institute: Immigrants and Immigration

Migration Policy Institute: Data Hub

Kidsdata Tip

Join Kidsdata on February 24th in Mountain View at the 10th Annual Santa Clara County Children’s Summit.

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New data on children with special health care needs

Kidsdata has released new, wide-ranging data on children with special health care needs (CSHCN) for California counties and cities, in collaboration with the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative.

Notable findings from all data about CSHCN include:

  • 36 percent of CSHCN in California receive care within a medical home, compared to 47 percent nationwide
  • 32 percent of black children had a special health care need, compared to 24 percent nationwide
  • 12 percent of CSHCN in California repeated a grade in school compared to 15 percent nationwide
  • 34 percent of CSHCN in California are overweight or obese, with central valley counties, as well as San Francisco County, showing the highest rates of obesity among counties with data.

Like all children, CSHCN need ready access to appropriate medical care, educational opportunities, and, sometimes, social services. By providing local estimates of demographics, insurance coverage, impact on families and quality of care, the new data give us a deeper understanding of the disparities and needs within this community.

Related Data

Prevalence of Special Health Care Needs Among Children

Active California Children’s Services (CCS) Enrollees

Children with Major Disabilities

Insured/Uninsured Children Who Have Special Health Care Needs

Poverty Among Children with Special Health Care Needs

Special Education Enrollment

Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties Among Children with Special Health Care Needs

Helpful Links

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health: Program for Children with Special Health Care Needs

Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP)

California Dept. of Education: Special Education

Family Voices

Maternal and Child Health Bureau: Children with Special Health Care Needs, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services

California Children’s Services (CCS) Redesign: Whole-Child Model, California Dept. of Health Care Services

Children’s Mental Health Report, Child Mind Institute

Immigrant Families, Children with Special Health Care Needs, and the Medical Home, Pediatrics

Low-Income Children with Special Health Care Needs and the Affordable Care Act, Catalyst Center

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Latino and black babies see large gains in breastfeeding rates

Mother Breastfeeding Her Newborn Baby Beside WindowBetween 2010-2014, Latino and black newborns in California experienced large increases in being exclusively fed breast milk during hospitalization after birth, according to the latest data available on kidsdata.org.

During this time period, Latino newborns saw a 28 percent jump in exclusive breastfeeding. Yet, at 62 percent, the breastfeeding rate for Latino newborns is still below the statewide average of 67 percent. Black babies saw a 22 percent jump, reaching 56 percent in 2014. At 80 percent, white infants continue to have the highest percentages of exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital.

Breast milk is widely acknowledged as the most complete form of nutrition for infants, with a range of benefits for infant health, growth, and development. Infants who are breastfed receive protection from serious health conditions, including respiratory, ear, and gastrointestinal tract infections, allergies, diabetes, and obesity.

Increasing the proportion of children who are breastfed for at least the first year of life—as well as the percentage who are breastfed exclusively for the first six months—are important public health goals. In fact, the California Department of Public Health has a statewide goal to make breastfeeding the normal method of infant feeding for at least the first year of life.

Related Data

Breastfeeding of Newborns, by Breastfeeding Status

Births

Infants Born at Low Birthweight

Preterm Births

Infants Whose Mothers Received Prenatal Care in the First Trimester

Helpful Links

American Academy of Pediatrics: Breastfeeding Initiatives

California Breastfeeding Coalition

Breastfeeding Among Minority Women: Moving from Risk Factors to Interventions, Advances in Nutrition

Public Policies to Support Breastfeeding: Paid Family Leave and Workplace Lactation Accommodations, CLASP & Breastfeed LA

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding Medicine

Racial Disparities in Access to Maternity Care Practices That Support Breastfeeding—United States, 2011, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Kidsdata Tip

Kidsdata is proud to sponsor Southern California’s Open DataFest on January 24 in Los Angeles!

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Kidsdata 2016 Highlights

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As 2016 comes to a close, we would like to thank all of you who use Kidsdata to improve children’s health and well being in California. We also want to make sure you didn’t miss four of this year’s most notable Kidsdata highlights:

New Data: In October, we released a suite of data on childhood adversity and resilience for the first time in the site’s history. The data release was covered by Slate, California Healthline, and other media outlets. Our team also updated more than 100 other indicators on our site.

Press: In June, the Napa County Board of Supervisors released a report that looked into the possible causes behind the county’s high rate of childhood cancer. The report was produced after a local community group used Kidsdata to help alert the board to the county’s disproportionately high rate of childhood cancer.

New Team Member: In April, we welcomed senior manager of data and research, Lori Turk-Bicakci, to the Kidsdata team! Lori came to us with extensive experience in project management, data collection and analysis, and a strong commitment to eliminating disparities in child health and well being.

Kudos: In January, Kidsdata received commendations from Karen Smith, director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and Diana Dooley, secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency. Kidsdata collaborates with CDPH on a number of initiatives about children’s health and well being.

Finally, if you’ve used Kidsdata for a successful grant application, project or campaign this year, please share your story with us! We’re always eager to know how Kidsdata has helped your work.

Happy Holidays!

– The Kidsdata Team

Top 5 Advisories

Childhood Adversity Data Now Available on Kidsdata

Infant Care in CA Now Costs as Much as UC Tuition

CA Schools Face Acute Shortage of Nurses and Counselors

Highest Concentration of Child Hunger in CA Shifts to Northernmost Counties

Number of CA Students with Autism Rises Sixfold Since 2002

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Measuring resilience among California children

Why is it that some of us are able to overcome childhood trauma while others are not? Resilience, the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, can curb the effects of trauma and adversity such as physical abuse, exposure to substance abuse, and unmet basic needs.

In California, an estimated one third of children are not resilient when facing a challenge, according to parent-reported data from the National Survey of Children’s Health, now available on Kidsdata. The data come from a suite of data related to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) that were recently released on Kidsdata.

At the county level, the data show that Marin County, in addition to several Gold Country counties, had the highest rates of resilience, at 72 percent. On the other end of the spectrum, Imperial County, along with several Central Valley counties, had the lowest rates of resilience, at less than 65 percent.

A number of policies and programs can help prevent child abuse and neglect, and curb the effects of childhood adversity, including strengthening parent education, improving the social safety net for families in need, and institutionalizing “trauma-informed” community services and health care.

Resilience comes from having adaptive abilities, positive experiences, and a stable, supportive relationship with at least one adult, according to a 2015 report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child at Harvard University. And resilience can be built over time, at any age, by engaging in various forms of stress reduction, including meditation and physical exercise, the report says.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Prevention Institute

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Kidsdata Tip

Did you know that you can embed Kidsdata visuals directly on your own web site? This way, data on your site will be updated whenever Kidsdata data are updated. Read our embedding instructions.

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Central Valley moms of infants show high rates of childhood trauma

For the first time, Kidsdata now has data that paint a unique picture of childhood trauma experienced by mothers of infants across California.

2011-2012 data from the California Department of Public Health’s Maternal and Infant Health Assessment show two counties (among counties with data), Kern and Stanislaus, where more than 10 percent of postpartum mothers say they experienced four or more childhood hardships, from not having their basic needs met, to parental legal trouble or incarceration, to foster care placement, among others. The higher number of traumatic events a child experiences, the more long-lasting impacts those events may have on the child’s physical, mental, and emotional health.

Fifteen percent of the state’s postpartum mothers say they lived with a parent or guardian with a serious substance abuse problem during their childhoods. When broken down by county however, the Central Valley again shows a disproportionate amount of trauma. In Kern and Stanislaus counties, roughly 20 percent of postpartum mothers were exposed to serious substance abuse during their childhoods. Similarly, Tulare, Stanislaus and Fresno counties were among the counties with the highest percentages of postpartum mothers who experienced family hunger during their childhoods.

Childhood adversity can lead to serious, long-term impacts on one’s health and well being. Resilience, an adaptive response to hardship, can mitigate the effects of adverse childhood experiences.

A number of policies and programs can help curb the effects of childhood adversity, including strengthening parent education, improving the social safety net for families in need, and institutionalizing “trauma-informed” community services and health care.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

Maternal and Infant Health Assessment

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience: A Framework for Addressing and Preventing Community Trauma

Kidsdata Tip

Kidsdata launched a suite of data about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) at the ACEs Conference in San Francisco last month. Read more.

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One in five CA adults reports being physically abused as a child

Twenty one percent of California’s adults with children living in their homes report that they were hit, beaten, kicked, or physically hurt by their own parents, or other adults in the home, when they were children. Ten percent say that they were sexually abused as a child. The survey data, now available on Kidsdata, are the first ever released on childhood trauma among the state’s adults with children living in their homes, versus all adults.

The data come from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which is the largest continuously conducted health survey system in the world.

Childhood adversity, sometimes referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), has come to be seen as an urgent public health crisis. A wealth of research shows that parents who experienced abuse as children have a higher likelihood of abusing their own children. However, parents who were abused do not all repeat the cycle of violence with their own children. Kidsdata’s release also includes data on child resiliency, or the ability to mitigate the effects of childhood trauma.

The higher number of traumatic events a child experiences, the more long-lasting impacts those events may have on the child’s physical, mental and emotional health. These events often lead to serious complications in adulthood, such as chronic diseases, substance abuse and depression. Consequently, parents who were abused as children are more susceptible to these problems as adults, all of which can impair their ability to meet their children’s needs.

Kidsdata’s new data help policymakers, researchers, social workers and practitioners identify opportunities to prevent childhood trauma, allay its effects, and develop better community support systems that promote resiliency. While California has made strides in these areas, continued efforts are needed to ensure that all children thrive and reach their full potential.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: Adverse Childhood Experiences

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Assessing the Impact on Health and School Engagement and the Mitigating Role of Resilience

Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience: A Framework for Addressing and Preventing Community Trauma

Kidsdata Tip

How do you take your data? Kidsdata’s got tables, bars, trends, maps and pies – try them out!

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Childhood adversity data now available on Kidsdata

Big Family Kids Parents Grandparents Generation Illustration

Today, Kidsdata introduces a brand-new topic to our site, Childhood Adversity and Resilience. The release today coincides with the opening of the Conference on Adverse Childhood Experiences in San Francisco.

The new suite of data complements other Kidsdata topics such as Child Abuse and Neglect, Intimate Partner Violence, and Family Income and Poverty. It includes 56 indicators about the prevalence of adversity and resiliency among California’s children, among mothers of infants reflecting on their childhood, and, exclusive to Kidsdata, among California adults with children living in their homes reflecting on their childhood.

Specific childhood adversity indicators give us a picture of the prevalence of physical, sexual, and verbal abuse inflicted on California children, and exposure to violence, substance abuse, and mental illness. Kidsdata’s release today also includes data on child resiliency, or the ability to mitigate the effects of childhood trauma.

Childhood adversity, sometimes referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), has come to be seen as an urgent public health crisis. The higher number of traumatic events a child experiences, the more long-lasting impacts those events may have on the child’s physical, mental, and emotional health. These events often lead to serious complications in adulthood, such as chronic diseases, substance abuse, and depression.

California-specific data were compiled from the National Survey of Children’s Health, the Maternal and Infant Health Assessment, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

This new topic was made possible by a partnership between Kidsdata and the California Essentials for Childhood Initiative and its Shared Data and Outcomes Workgroup, as well as numerous organizations that provided data: Public Health Institute’s Survey Research Group, the California Department of Public Health’s Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, the University of California, San Francisco’s Center on Social Disparities in Health, and the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative.

Today’s data release helps policymakers, researchers, social workers, and practitioners identify opportunities to prevent childhood trauma, allay its effects, and develop better community support systems that promote resiliency. While California has made strides in these areas, continued efforts are needed to ensure that all children thrive and reach their full potential.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: Adverse Childhood Experiences

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Assessing the Impact on Health and School Engagement and the Mitigating Role of Resilience

Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience: A Framework for Addressing and Preventing Community Trauma

Kidsdata Tip

Like all data on Kidsdata, the new Childhood Adversity and Resilience indicators can be easily customized, visualized, shared, and in many cases, drilled down to county level data.

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Infant care in CA now costs as much as UC tuition

California parents are hit hard in the wallet not only when their kids head out to college, but also in the first two years of their children’s lives. According to the latest data on Kidsdata, the state’s parents spent an average of $13,327 per year to send their infants to a child care center in 2014, the same year that UC tuition and fees hit $13,222 (PDF). Nationally, childcare for children below age five has also exceeded that of in-state college tuition.

When broken down by county, Bay Area counties had the highest costs of infant care, with Marin County leading the pack at more than $18,000 per year, while more rural counties in far northern California and the central valley had the lowest costs for infant child care, at less than $12,000 per year.

Center-based infant care costs in California made up an estimated 14 percent of the median annual income for married couples and 45 percent for single parents in 2014. In 2014, California was ranked the 8th least affordable state for center-based infant care in the nation.

Despite the high costs of child care relative to income, nationally, the median hourly wage for child care workers is $9.77, and nearly half of this work force receives government assistance in the form of food stamps, welfare benefits, or Medicaid.

Early childhood is a critical period for cognitive, biological, and social development. The quality of children’s environments and experiences during these years can have lasting effects. From infancy, children are learning to relate to others and their environment while developing the skills to successfully navigate social, emotional, and educational challenges. Children who attend high-quality preschools tend to have better test scores, fewer behavioral problems, and higher rates of high school graduation, among other long-term benefits.

Policies that could improve child care include improving the state’s professional development infrastructure to prepare and support an effective early care workforce, making the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit fully refundable at the state level, and encouraging other federal solutions to address the high cost of child care.

Related Data

Annual Cost of Child Care

Availability of Child Care for Potential Demand

Number of Child Care Slots in Licensed Facilities

Number of Licensed Child Care Facilities

Children Ages 3-5 Not Enrolled in Preschool or Kindergarten

Helpful Links

California Child Care Resource & Referral Network

Community Care Licensing Division (CCLD) Facility Search

California Preschool Study

Center for the Study of Child Care Employment

A Matter of Equity: Preschool in America

High Quality Child Care Is Out of Reach for Working Families

Preschool and School Readiness: Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents

Kidsdata Tip

Come meet us this month! On October 10, Kidsdata will be conducting a free workshop in San Rafael, hosted by First 5 Marin. On October 21, Kidsdata will be introducing a new topic at the Adverse Childhood Experiences Conference in San Francisco.

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Have an idea to improve health in your community?

Our data about the social determinants of health for children help many of our users come up with innovative ideas to improve health in our communities.  Be sure to check out the Innovation Challenge 2.0, which encourages community and health advocates across the state to share ideas and projects they are working on to address the factors that shape our health. Social determinants of health, such as such as air quality, family income and poverty, housing affordability, early care and education, are available for you to customize and visualize on kidsdata.org.

The deadline to submit your innovative idea is October 19, 2016.

For more information, visit the Let’s Get Healthy California website.

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