Kidsdata on the Air

Thanks Kidsdata, for helping me give a clear, accurate picture of Novato kids’ mental and physical health.

When Marian Schinske, Founder and Executive Director of NovatoSpririt, looks for data to illustrate the need for her youth athletic scholarship program, she always turns to Kidsdata as her source for reliable information. During a recent interview with KWMR Radio, a local Marin County station, Marian used Kidsdata to inform listeners of the state of children’s mental and physical health in the city of Novato:

“I recently did some research about the overall health of NovatoSpirit kids through a wonderful resource called kidsdata.org, which is a program of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health. I found that compared to children living elsewhere in Marin, Novato children may be less healthy and more vulnerable. For example, childhood obesity rates in Novato are higher than Marin County’s average rate. In Novato Unified School District, about one out of every three children in the 5th, 7th, and 9th grades is overweight, and physical fitness among Novato school kids decreased in recent years. Also, suicidal ideation, which means having thoughts about suicide, occurs more frequently amongst kids in Novato than amongst others county-wide. The most vulnerable time for all kids, everywhere, is the 9th grade, where 23 percent of Novato Unified School District children reported suicidal ideation. So sadly, 1 out of 5 high school freshmen here contemplates suicide. To me, this fact alone shows that all children here need more attention, guidance, empathy, and opportunity.”

When she’s not behind the microphone, Marian uses Kidsdata for grant proposals and presentations to city and school district officials across Marin County. She also uses Kidsdata in her annual reports for NovatoSpirit’s Board of Directors and donors.

“What’s great about Kidsdata is that I am able to tailor the information to the interests of my listeners and readers,” she says. “Everyone who has encountered the data has been very surprised. They have no idea that children could be so vulnerable, especially here in Marin County. Kidsdata gives some very eye-opening information that can encourage others to view Novato’s children with more empathy and understanding.”

For more stories from our users, visit our Data in Action page. Have a story of your own? Submit it using our online form or email us at Kidsdata@lpfch.org.

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1/3 of CA children who need mental health treatment fail to receive it

Thirty-seven percent of California children who need mental health treatment failed to receive it, according to the most recent data available on kidsdata.org. Madera, Merced, Monterey, and Tulare counties had the lowest rates of all counties with available data, with nearly half of children who need mental health treatment failing to receive it in the previous 12 months.

Screening, early identification, and treatment are critical, as untreated mental illness can disrupt children’s development, academic achievement, and their ability to lead healthy, productive lives.

Policy options that could support mental health care services include ensuring that mental health funding is aligned with high-risk populations, improving coordinated, cross-sector strategies by integrating mental health services with other systems, promoting mental health training for pediatricians, and expanding the workforce of qualified mental health professionals serving youth.

Related Data

Children’s Emotional Health

Community Connectedness

Disconnected Youth

School Connectedness

Youth Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use

Youth Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use

Helpful Links

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Mental Health

National Institute of Mental Health: Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Overlooked and Underserved: “Action Signs” for Identifying Children with Unmet Mental Health Needs, Pediatrics

Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience, National Scientific Council on the Developing Child

Three Out of Four Children with Mental Health Needs in California Do Not Receive Treatment Despite Having Health Care Coverage, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research

Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing

Kidsdata Tip

Join Kidsdata and the California Department of Public Health on March 29 for a webinar on Childhood Adversity: Data to Help Advocate for Change. Read more and register.

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Webinar: Childhood Adversity – Data to Help Advocate for Change

Date: Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Time: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. PT

Childhood adversity, such as child abuse and exposure to violence and poverty, can have negative long-term impacts on health and well being. In this webinar, our panelists will discuss how to describe the burden of childhood adversity in your community, how to frame your message most effectively, and how to engage and mobilize your community to address the roots and effects of childhood adversity.

Panelists will also lead participants on a virtual tour of Kidsdata’s Childhood Adversity and Resilience data, research, and policy recommendations.

Register


Marissa Abbott

Marissa is a California Epidemiologic Investigation Service (Cal-EIS) Fellow at the California Department of Public Health. She is placed in the Safe and Active Communities Branch and primarily supports the CDC-funded California Essentials for Childhood Initiative, a child maltreatment prevention project. Prior to her fellowship, Marissa completed her Master of Public Health (MPH) degree at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry as a part of their 3-2 Program.


Nathan Porter

Nathan is Data Manager at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, where he works on kidsdata.org, a public service website that allows users to easily find, customize, and share data on more than 600 measures of child health and well being. Kidsdata.org makes it simple to incorporate trusted data for every county, city, school district, and legislative district in California into reports, presentations, articles, grant proposals, policy decisions, and advocacy work.

Childhood Adversity and Resilience Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences

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CA youth mental health hospitalizations up 50 percent since 2007

Between 2007-2015, the rate of youth mental health hospitalizations rose by 50 percent, according to the latest data available on Kidsdata. In seven counties, the rate grew during this time period by more than 100 percent. Fresno county had, by far, the most drastic rise, at 241 percent.

Similarly, both California and the US have begun seeing a rise in self-inflicted injury hospitalizations among youth in recent years. Between 2009-2014, the national rate of self-inflicted injury hospitalizations among youth age 5-20 jumped by 88 percent. During the same time period, the rate jumped 17 percent in California. San Mateo County had one of the highest rates in California, with 71 hospitalizations per 100,000 youth.

The vast majority of emotional health problems begin in adolescence and young adulthood, with half of all disorders starting by age 14. Experts recommend shifting from a focus on prevention and treatment of mental illness to promoting mental wellness. Mental health is influenced by socioeconomic, biological, and environmental factors, and promoting positive emotional health requires coordinated, cross-sector strategies that target underlying causes.

Helpful Links

California Youth Crisis Line

Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools

Bullying and Suicide: A Public Health Approach

Mental Health and Suicidality Among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Sexual Minority Youths

Portrait of Promise: The California Statewide Plan to Promote Health and Mental Health Equity

Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience

Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing

Kidsdata Tip

Happening this Friday: Kidsdata will present “Opportunities for Youth to Overcome Chronic Stress and Improve Mental Health” at the Santa Clara County Children’s Summit.

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Half of CA children have immigrant parents

Immigrant child and mother holding handsSweeping changes to federal immigration policy could have a disproportionate effect on California, where 50 percent of children have at least one immigrant parent, compared to 25 percent nationwide, according to the latest data available on Kidsdata. That translates to 4.5 million children in California alone. In congressional districts 17, 34 and 46, which represent parts of greater Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, more than 75 percent of children have at least one immigrant parent.

In 2013, California passed immigration legislation to address disparities between immigrant and non-immigrant families. California also offers some benefits to undocumented immigrant children that would not be available under federal law, including Medi-Cal, post-secondary financial aid, and domestic worker protections for their parents. Additionally, the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, introduced in 2012, was viewed as important temporary relief from deportation, expanding the socioeconomic mobility and trajectories for eligible youth. Under the new administration, the future of the DACA program is uncertain.

For mixed-immigration-status families, family separation poses serious risks for children, including emotional trauma, housing insecurity and food insecurity. Immigration policies must not lose sight of the well being of children and their families.

Related Data

Immigrants (Summary)

Children Living in Linguistically Isolated Households

Children Living with One or More Foreign-Born Parent

Foreign-Born Population, by Age Group

Race or National Origin as Reason for Bullying/Harassment

Public School Enrollment, by Race/Ethnicity

English Learners in Public Schools

Helpful Links

Immigrant-Inclusive State and Local Policies Move Ahead in 2014-15 (PDF), National Immigration Law Center

The Educational, Psychological, and Social Impact of Discrimination on the Immigrant Child, Migration Policy Institute

National Council of La Raza

Asian Pacific Islander (API) Population Report: In Our Own Words, California Dept. of Public Health, Office Of Health Equity

Urban Institute: Immigrants and Immigration

Migration Policy Institute: Data Hub

Kidsdata Tip

Join Kidsdata on February 24th in Mountain View at the 10th Annual Santa Clara County Children’s Summit.

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New data on children with special health care needs

Kidsdata has released new, wide-ranging data on children with special health care needs (CSHCN) for California counties and cities, in collaboration with the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative.

Notable findings from all data about CSHCN include:

  • 36 percent of CSHCN in California receive care within a medical home, compared to 47 percent nationwide
  • 32 percent of black children had a special health care need, compared to 24 percent nationwide
  • 12 percent of CSHCN in California repeated a grade in school compared to 15 percent nationwide
  • 34 percent of CSHCN in California are overweight or obese, with central valley counties, as well as San Francisco County, showing the highest rates of obesity among counties with data.

Like all children, CSHCN need ready access to appropriate medical care, educational opportunities, and, sometimes, social services. By providing local estimates of demographics, insurance coverage, impact on families and quality of care, the new data give us a deeper understanding of the disparities and needs within this community.

Related Data

Prevalence of Special Health Care Needs Among Children

Active California Children’s Services (CCS) Enrollees

Children with Major Disabilities

Insured/Uninsured Children Who Have Special Health Care Needs

Poverty Among Children with Special Health Care Needs

Special Education Enrollment

Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties Among Children with Special Health Care Needs

Helpful Links

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health: Program for Children with Special Health Care Needs

Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP)

California Dept. of Education: Special Education

Family Voices

Maternal and Child Health Bureau: Children with Special Health Care Needs, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services

California Children’s Services (CCS) Redesign: Whole-Child Model, California Dept. of Health Care Services

Children’s Mental Health Report, Child Mind Institute

Immigrant Families, Children with Special Health Care Needs, and the Medical Home, Pediatrics

Low-Income Children with Special Health Care Needs and the Affordable Care Act, Catalyst Center

Kidsdata Tip

Want to make sure that you get Kidsdata alerts for specific topics? Manage your email subscriptions.

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Latino and black babies see large gains in breastfeeding rates

Mother Breastfeeding Her Newborn Baby Beside WindowBetween 2010-2014, Latino and black newborns in California experienced large increases in being exclusively fed breast milk during hospitalization after birth, according to the latest data available on kidsdata.org.

During this time period, Latino newborns saw a 28 percent jump in exclusive breastfeeding. Yet, at 62 percent, the breastfeeding rate for Latino newborns is still below the statewide average of 67 percent. Black babies saw a 22 percent jump, reaching 56 percent in 2014. At 80 percent, white infants continue to have the highest percentages of exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital.

Breast milk is widely acknowledged as the most complete form of nutrition for infants, with a range of benefits for infant health, growth, and development. Infants who are breastfed receive protection from serious health conditions, including respiratory, ear, and gastrointestinal tract infections, allergies, diabetes, and obesity.

Increasing the proportion of children who are breastfed for at least the first year of life—as well as the percentage who are breastfed exclusively for the first six months—are important public health goals. In fact, the California Department of Public Health has a statewide goal to make breastfeeding the normal method of infant feeding for at least the first year of life.

Related Data

Breastfeeding of Newborns, by Breastfeeding Status

Births

Infants Born at Low Birthweight

Preterm Births

Infants Whose Mothers Received Prenatal Care in the First Trimester

Helpful Links

American Academy of Pediatrics: Breastfeeding Initiatives

California Breastfeeding Coalition

Breastfeeding Among Minority Women: Moving from Risk Factors to Interventions, Advances in Nutrition

Public Policies to Support Breastfeeding: Paid Family Leave and Workplace Lactation Accommodations, CLASP & Breastfeed LA

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding Medicine

Racial Disparities in Access to Maternity Care Practices That Support Breastfeeding—United States, 2011, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Kidsdata Tip

Kidsdata is proud to sponsor Southern California’s Open DataFest on January 24 in Los Angeles!

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Kidsdata 2016 Highlights

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As 2016 comes to a close, we would like to thank all of you who use Kidsdata to improve children’s health and well being in California. We also want to make sure you didn’t miss four of this year’s most notable Kidsdata highlights:

New Data: In October, we released a suite of data on childhood adversity and resilience for the first time in the site’s history. The data release was covered by Slate, California Healthline, and other media outlets. Our team also updated more than 100 other indicators on our site.

Press: In June, the Napa County Board of Supervisors released a report that looked into the possible causes behind the county’s high rate of childhood cancer. The report was produced after a local community group used Kidsdata to help alert the board to the county’s disproportionately high rate of childhood cancer.

New Team Member: In April, we welcomed senior manager of data and research, Lori Turk-Bicakci, to the Kidsdata team! Lori came to us with extensive experience in project management, data collection and analysis, and a strong commitment to eliminating disparities in child health and well being.

Kudos: In January, Kidsdata received commendations from Karen Smith, director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and Diana Dooley, secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency. Kidsdata collaborates with CDPH on a number of initiatives about children’s health and well being.

Finally, if you’ve used Kidsdata for a successful grant application, project or campaign this year, please share your story with us! We’re always eager to know how Kidsdata has helped your work.

Happy Holidays!

– The Kidsdata Team

Top 5 Advisories

Childhood Adversity Data Now Available on Kidsdata

Infant Care in CA Now Costs as Much as UC Tuition

CA Schools Face Acute Shortage of Nurses and Counselors

Highest Concentration of Child Hunger in CA Shifts to Northernmost Counties

Number of CA Students with Autism Rises Sixfold Since 2002

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Measuring resilience among California children

Why is it that some of us are able to overcome childhood trauma while others are not? Resilience, the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, can curb the effects of trauma and adversity such as physical abuse, exposure to substance abuse, and unmet basic needs.

In California, an estimated one third of children are not resilient when facing a challenge, according to parent-reported data from the National Survey of Children’s Health, now available on Kidsdata. The data come from a suite of data related to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) that were recently released on Kidsdata.

At the county level, the data show that Marin County, in addition to several Gold Country counties, had the highest rates of resilience, at 72 percent. On the other end of the spectrum, Imperial County, along with several Central Valley counties, had the lowest rates of resilience, at less than 65 percent.

A number of policies and programs can help prevent child abuse and neglect, and curb the effects of childhood adversity, including strengthening parent education, improving the social safety net for families in need, and institutionalizing “trauma-informed” community services and health care.

Resilience comes from having adaptive abilities, positive experiences, and a stable, supportive relationship with at least one adult, according to a 2015 report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child at Harvard University. And resilience can be built over time, at any age, by engaging in various forms of stress reduction, including meditation and physical exercise, the report says.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Prevention Institute

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Kidsdata Tip

Did you know that you can embed Kidsdata visuals directly on your own web site? This way, data on your site will be updated whenever Kidsdata data are updated. Read our embedding instructions.

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Central Valley moms of infants show high rates of childhood trauma

For the first time, Kidsdata now has data that paint a unique picture of childhood trauma experienced by mothers of infants across California.

2011-2012 data from the California Department of Public Health’s Maternal and Infant Health Assessment show two counties (among counties with data), Kern and Stanislaus, where more than 10 percent of postpartum mothers say they experienced four or more childhood hardships, from not having their basic needs met, to parental legal trouble or incarceration, to foster care placement, among others. The higher number of traumatic events a child experiences, the more long-lasting impacts those events may have on the child’s physical, mental, and emotional health.

Fifteen percent of the state’s postpartum mothers say they lived with a parent or guardian with a serious substance abuse problem during their childhoods. When broken down by county however, the Central Valley again shows a disproportionate amount of trauma. In Kern and Stanislaus counties, roughly 20 percent of postpartum mothers were exposed to serious substance abuse during their childhoods. Similarly, Tulare, Stanislaus and Fresno counties were among the counties with the highest percentages of postpartum mothers who experienced family hunger during their childhoods.

Childhood adversity can lead to serious, long-term impacts on one’s health and well being. Resilience, an adaptive response to hardship, can mitigate the effects of adverse childhood experiences.

A number of policies and programs can help curb the effects of childhood adversity, including strengthening parent education, improving the social safety net for families in need, and institutionalizing “trauma-informed” community services and health care.

Related Data

Childhood Adversity and Resilience (summary)

Children with Two or More Adverse Experiences (Parent Reported)

Children Who Are Usually/Always Resilient (Parent Reported)

Prevalence of Childhood Hardships (Maternal Retrospective)

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (Adult Retrospective)

Helpful Links

Maternal and Infant Health Assessment

ACEs Connection

California Essentials for Childhood Initiative

Center for Youth Wellness

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative: Childhood Trauma and Positive Health

Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience: A Framework for Addressing and Preventing Community Trauma

Kidsdata Tip

Kidsdata launched a suite of data about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) at the ACEs Conference in San Francisco last month. Read more.

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