ARCHIVED WEBINAR: How to Put Legislative District Data to Work For California Children

If you missed our July webinar on using legislative district data to work on behalf of children, the recording is now available!

The webinar covers how to access data available by legislative district and overlay legislative district maps on many other indicators of child health and well-being available by county, city or school district. To see a list of all kidsdata.org indicators available by legislative district, click here.

Questions? Email us at kidsdata@lpfch.org. To sign up for announcements of upcoming webinars, data alerts and other news from kidsdata.org, click here.

 

RELATED CONTENT:

Tracking Children’s Health and Well-Being in California’s Legislative Districts

ARCHIVED WEBINAR: The New Kidsdata.org: Putting Data to Work for California Children

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Tracking Children’s Health and Well-Being in California’s Legislative Districts

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Did you know that kidsdata.org gives you the ability to view data by California state and national legislative districts, and to overlay legislative maps on indicators of child health and well-being that are not available by legislative district?

Our July 15 webinar, How To Put Legislative District Data To Work For California Children, covers how to get the most out of these features. We’ll post a recording of the webinar shortly. In the meantime, here’s a “cheat sheet” of kidsdata.org indicators available by legislative district.

Demographics

Child Population, by Legislative District

Demographics of Children with Special Needs

Children with Major Disabilities, by Legislative District

Percentage of Insured/Uninsured Children Who Have Major Disabilities, by Legislative District

Family Structure

Children in the Care of Grandparents, by Legislative District

Family Structure for Children in Households, by Legislative District

Family Structure for Children in Households, by Legislative District and Race/Ethnicity

Households with and without Children, by Legislative District

Immigrants

Children Living in Linguistically Isolated Households, by Legislative District

Children Living with One or More Foreign-Born Parent (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District

Children Living with One or More Foreign-Born Parent (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District and Income Level

Foreign-Born Population (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District

Early Education and Child Care

Children Ages 3-5 Not Enrolled in Preschool or Kindergarten, by Legislative District

Disconnected Youth

Teens Not in School and Not Working, by Legislative District

Family Income and Poverty

Children in Poverty (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District

Children in Poverty (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District and Race/Ethnicity

Children Living Above and Below the Poverty Level (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District and Income Level

Children Living Above and Below the Poverty Level (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District, Income Level and Family Type

Children Living in Low-Income Working Families, by Legislative District

Median Family Income, by Legislative District

Housing Affordability

Children Living in Crowded Households, by Legislative District

Households with a High Housing Cost Burden, by Legislative District

Unemployment

Children Without Secure Parental Employment, by Legislative District

Health Care

Health Insurance Coverage (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District

Health Insurance Coverage (Regions of 10,000 Residents or More), by Legislative District and Race/Ethnicity

 

 

RELATED CONTENT:

The New Kidsdata: Using Legislative Maps

ARCHIVED WEBINAR: The New Kidsdata.org: Putting Data to Work for California Children

Data in Your Pocket: Kidsdata.org Goes Mobile

 

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Webinar: How To Put Legislative District Data To Work For California Children

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Tuesday, July 15, 2014 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM PDT

If you work for, or regularly connect with, state or federal lawmakers on behalf of California children, this 1-hour webinar is for you.

Kidsdata.org is a free website that tracks more than 500 measures of child health and well-being, covering every legislative district, county, city and school district in California. It’s one of the few child-focused data sites that make data available by state and federal legislative districts. The site is operated by the nonpartisan Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health.

REGISTER NOW

In this webinar, you’ll learn how to use kidsdata.org to:

* Access data available by legislative district
* Overlay legislative maps on many indicators of child health and well-being
* Find the data you need, by topic, region or demographic group
* Customize visualizations to meet your needs
* Download data for analysis
* Communicate your data and findings in reports, presentations, proposals, social media and more

After a recent redesign, kidsdata.org has many new features — so, even if you’re an experienced user, you’ll want to attend this 1-hour webinar.

Who should participate:

Anyone who interacts with the California legislature or federal lawmakers and is interested in children’s issues: legislative staffers, grant writers, educators, advocates, policy analysts, health providers, consultants, communications professionals and others.

Presenter: Regan Foust, Ph.D., Data Manager, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health

Can’t attend? Don’t worry! The session will be recorded and posted on the foundation’s website after the webinar.

Questions? Email Barbara.FederOstrov@lpfch.org.

 

RELATED CONTENT:

Tracking Children’s Health and Well-Being in California’s Legislative Districts

ARCHIVED WEBINAR: The New Kidsdata.org: Putting Data to Work for California Children

Data in Your Pocket: Kidsdata.org Goes Mobile

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In California’s Immigrant Families, Reading or Sharing Books with Children Less Common

Father-Reading-to-Toddler

A new Stanford study suggests that immigrant parents may not read to or share books with their young children as often as non-immigrant parents, prompting concerns about those children’s school readiness.

Hispanic or Asian immigrant families in California were less likely to read or look at picture books with their young children than native-born parents, regardless of income or educational status, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers found in the study, published in the journal Pediatrics. The researchers used California Health Interview Survey data from 2005, 2007 and 2009. Across ethnicities, 57.5% of parents in immigrant families reported daily book sharing or reading, compared with about 75.8% of native-born parents.

Researchers have long known that parents in low-income or limited-English households are less likely to read books with their children in early childhood. These children are more likely to enter school with language and pre-literacy skill delays compared to their peers.

The issue is particularly important in California, where about half of children live with one or more foreign-born parents and about 12% of children live in in linguistically-isolated households.

Kidsdata.org offers demographic indicators relating to children, immigration status and reading at the state, county and, in some cases, school district level:

Young Children Whose Parents Read Books With Them, by Frequency

Children Living with Foreign-Born Parents

English Learners

Foreign-Born Population

Third Grade Students Scoring Proficient or Higher on English Language Arts CST

by English Language Fluency

by Race/Ethnicity

by Socioeconomic Status

photo credit: John Mick via Flickr

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School Nurses: Still in Short Supply, But Earning Their Keep

school_nurses_2014

A program to add more registered nurses in Massachusetts public schools more than justified its costs by reducing medical costs and the need for parents to stay home from work, according to a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics.

CDC researchers found that $2.20 was saved for each dollar invested in the school nurse program.

The study appears at a time when school districts nationwide have been cutting back on nurses rather than adding them.

In addition, a recent report commissioned by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health found that health services for California students with special health care needs vary greatly by school district, are provided by a variety of school staff, operate under a confusing patchwork of regulations, and are often underfunded.

In California, there is one full-time equivalent nurse for every 2,815 students, well above the CDC-recommended ratio of one nurse for every 750 students. In one county, only one nurse serves more than 13,000 students.

 

See more data on school nurses in California:

Number of School Nurses, By County

Ratio of Students to School Nurses, By County

 

Related Content:

Cost-Benefit Study of School Nursing Services, JAMA Pediatrics, May 19, 2014

The ‘Hidden Health Care System’ in California Schools and Children with Special Health Care Needs

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Mental Health Awareness Week: In California, Mental Health Hospitalizations for Children and Youth on the Rise

mental_health_awareness_week_2014

As National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week gets under way, we’re highlighting child mental health data available at kidsdata.org:

* Mental health hospitalization rates are rising for teenagers ages 15-19 in California: their mental health hospitalization rate rose 34% between 2007 and 2012.

* In 2012, children and teens faced mental health concerns serious enough to warrant nearly 38,000 hospitalizations.

Nationwide, mental health disorders among children and youth are on the rise, with an estimated one in five American children experiencing problems ranging from mild to life-threatening, according to a 2013 CDC study.

Experts who have studied mental health hospitalizations of children and youth say that while rates of these hospitalizations are higher, in-patient stays are shorter than in previous years possibly due to changes in health insurance authorizations for hospitalization and a decrease in available psychiatric beds.

For a deeper dive into our child mental health data, see these indicators:

Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group

Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level

by Gender and Grade Level

by Level of Connectedness to School

by Race/Ethnicity

Youth Suicide Rate

Number of Youth Suicides, by Age

by Gender

by Race/Ethnicity

Self-Inflicted Injury Hospitalizations

by Age

 

Other Resources

National Center for Children in Poverty: Children’s Mental Health

National Institute of Mental Health: Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Social and Emotional Development in Children and Adolescents Knowledge Path

Posted by Barbara Feder Ostrov

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Healthy Communities Data Summit: Talking About Big Data and California Communities

Healthy Communities Data Summit Logo

We’re excited to be supporting the Healthy Communities Data Summit on June 11!

The upcoming conference at the University of California-Los Angeles will bring together people working with Big Data to improve health and wellness in California communities.

The Healthy Communities Data Summit is hosted by the Foundation for Healthcare Innovation and Health 2.0, and sponsored by the California HealthCare Foundation, The California Wellness Foundation and the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, home to kidsdata.org.

Kidsdata.org’s data manager, Regan Foust, will showcase the site on the panel “New Frontiers for California: Datasets and Resources in Health Care,” which highlights data resources driving the future of public health, new health care startups, and new collaborations.

Here are more highlights from the conference:

  • Live demonstrations from new companies and newly captured health data.
  • Announcements of state-level projects, case studies, best practices, and lessons learned from access to free government data.
  • A full day of high profile panels outlining patient health challenges and needs, as illustrated by timely, relevant health data.
  • Publication of new open data challenge efforts and new prize efforts catalyzing citizen innovation efforts & more.

Get more information on the conference, including the agenda and how to register. We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles on June 11!

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By Any Measure, Many California Children Still Live in Poverty

poverty The percentage of California children living in poverty remains high – even as the nation continues to recover from the recession. Two measures used by the federal government to assess poverty among American families, the Federal Poverty Level and the more state-specific Supplemental Poverty Measure, indicate that a quarter of the state’s children remain in poverty. A third measure suggests the numbers are even higher.

The Federal Poverty Level (FPL) for a family of two adults and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Using this standard, about 24% of California children lived in poverty that year, up from about 17% in 2007. The FPL is based on the basic food budget a family needs to meet minimum nutritional requirements but does not take into account other expenses like housing.

To address this limitation, the Census Bureau created the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). Unlike the FPL, the SPM takes into account regional differences in the cost of living (e.g., differences in the cost of food, clothing, shelter, utilities, etc.) and the benefits provided to needy families. According to the SPM, about 27% of California children lived in poverty in 2012, up from 25% in 2009.

The Supplemental Poverty Measure is only available at the state and national level, however. To assess the local situation, experts created Self-Sufficiency Standards for every California county. These standards calculate the estimated amount of money a family needs to adequately meet all its basic needs without public or private assistance.

On average, these standards are more than double the Federal Poverty Level. For example, the average California Self-Sufficiency Standard for two adults, one preschooler, and one school-aged child is $63,979. Reflecting California’s relatively high cost of living, more than half of families had incomes below the Self-Sufficiency Standard for their county in 2012.

Read more about child poverty in California, including policy implications>>

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Data in Your Pocket: Kidsdata.org Goes Mobile

Have you ever been in a meeting and needed quick access to info about kids in California? Good news! Kidsdata.org is now easier to use when you’re on the go: Our data are optimized for mobile devices.

mobile homepage

Your smartphone is perfect for looking up fast facts on children’s health and well-being in California. Just navigate to kidsdata.org (you might even want to bookmark it) to find what you’re seeking.

mobile screenshot

If you have questions about using the mobile version of kidsdata.org, please contact us at kidsdata@lpfch.org.

 

RELATED CONTENT:

Tutorial Videos: Get the Most Out of the New Kidsdata.org

ARCHIVED WEBINAR: The New Kidsdata.org: Putting Data to Work for California Children

The New Kidsdata: Using Legislative Maps

Big Changes to Kidsdata.org

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National Public Health Week: How California’s Children are Faring

Girls to be vaccinated

As National Public Health Week gets under way today, it’s a good time to examine how California’s kids are faring on some classic public health measures, including immunizations, exposure to lead and teen birth rates.

Here’s a sampling of public health indicators from kidsdata.org:

IMMUNIZATIONS

California children are required to get several immunizations before entering kindergarten. In 2013, 9 out of 10 California kindergartners received all required immunizations before starting school, but a rise in families using “personal belief exemptions” to avoid some or all required vaccines has public health officials concerned.
See data by county:

Kindergartners with All Required Immunizations

Kindergartners with Immunization Exemptions

 
LEAD POISONING

Exposure to lead has been linked to lower IQ, behavioral problems and other health problems in children. In 2011, 2,156 children/youth in California ages 0-20 (0.3% of all children tested) were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood, down from 0.6% in 2007. While elevated blood lead levels are defined as 9.5 micrograms per deciliter or more, most public health officials agree that there is no safe level of exposure to lead. Not all children in the state are tested for lead exposure, however, and the available data may understate lead exposure.

See data by county: Children/Youth with Elevated Blood Lead Levels, by Age

 
TEEN BIRTHS

In what’s widely regarded as a public health success story, teen births have declined sharply in both California and the U.S., although racial disparities remain. The teen birth rate in California decreased by 59% between 1995 and 2012, from 62.9 to 25.7 per 1,000 young women ages 15-19.

See data by county:

Teen Births by Age of Mother

Teen Births by Race/Ethnicity

 
LEARN MORE

Be sure to take a look at these other public health indicators, too!

Air Quality: Annual Average Particulate Matter Concentration

Infant Mortality Rate

Students Who Are at a Healthy Weight or Underweight, by Grade Level

Breastfeeding of Newborns, by Breastfeeding Status

Children Drinking One or More Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Per Day

Children Who Ate Fast Food Two or More Times in the Past Week, by Age Group

Children Who Eat Five or More Servings of Fruits/Vegetables Daily, by Age Group

Sexually Transmitted Infections

Water Quality Violations, by Violation Type

Infants Whose Mothers Received Prenatal Care in the First Trimester

Posted by Barbara Feder Ostrov

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