How One Nonprofit Uses Kidsdata.org

UWBA

“There’s absolutely no doubt that kidsdata.org has helped us get several grants and start lots of conversations in the community.”

So says India Swearingen, the evaluation and insight director for United Way of the Bay Area. Her agency is creating a movement to cut poverty in the region, and uses kidsdata.org to bolster grant proposals and to enhance the information in its community library.

Swearingen notes that she frequently uses the narrative context that accompanies every indicator on kidsdata. “I like the text that explains why the data is important—too often, we put out metrics and don’t explain their significance,” she says. While she also uses other data sites, she says that kidsdata is particularly easy to navigate, and it provides data at the county level that other sites may not have.

A recent survey of Kidsdata.org users showed that over one-third of site users are nonprofit service providers. Please help your nonprofit colleagues by sharing your story of how you use kidsdata.org in your work, and check out how other organizations have used data on our Data in Action page. Contact us at kidsdata@lpfch.org or post your story on our Facebook page.

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Addressing Millennial Morbidities: Accentuate the Positive

“Millennial morbidities” are those chronic and sometimes intractable medical problems—such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and family violence—that originate at the interface between biological, psychological, social, and environmental dimensions.

As public interest in the social determinants of health is increasing, the associations among these dimensions are getting more attention within pediatrics and other child- and family-serving professions. Unfortunately, this attention tends toward emphasizing the toxicity of challenging social circumstances rather than broadly considering how practice and policies can support the healthy development of children.

In a new piece published in JAMA Pediatrics, Ed Schor, MD, senior vice president at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, argues that while all stakeholders should work for social change and the reduction of poverty and inequality, pediatric practitioners should focus in particular on promoting child health and well-being by engaging with and supporting family members around the strengths they have individually and as a group. Read more.

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New Methodology Suggests Higher Rates of Child Maltreatment in California

Child Abuse
New research from the Children’s Data Network has the potential to transform our understanding of the scope of child maltreatment in California.

Typically, child abuse and neglect data are tracked at a single point in time—for example, when an allegation of abuse or neglect is reported to social workers, or when an abuse complaint is investigated and substantiated.

But researchers with the Network, based at the University of Southern California, linked vital birth records with California’s child protection system records to uncover higher rates of suspected maltreatment than had previously been known.

The researchers noted:

“Of the more than 500,000 children born in California each year, approximately 25,000 babies are reported for maltreatment during the first year of life. By age 5, the cumulative count of children reported grows to more than 80,000—or roughly 1 in 7 children born statewide.”

The research has helped identify children’s risk factors associated with the potential for maltreatment, including no paternity established at birth, a mother under age 30, or being part of families on public medical assistance.

See an interactive visualization of the data>>

Kidsdata.org offers data on both reported and substantiated cases of child neglect and abuse as well as on foster care.

See county-level data on child abuse and neglect>>
See county-level data on foster care>>

 

RELATED CONTENT:

Cumulative Risk of Child Protective Service Involvement before Age 5: A Population-Based Examination
Children’s Data Network

USC study challenges traditional data: points to higher rates of child abuse
KPCC news story, 12/3/14

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ARCHIVED WEBINAR: Using Student Homelessness Data to Advocate on Behalf of Children and Families

If you missed our November webinar, Using Student Homelessness Data to Advocate on Behalf of Children and Families, the recording is now available!

The story of California’s homeless students is largely a hidden one—many are doubled up with family and friends, while others live in shelters.

New data, however, show the extent of homelessness of California’s pre-K-12 students enrolled in public schools. Nearly 270,000 public school students in the state were homeless at some point in the 2012-2013 school year. That equates to about 4% of all California’s public school students, double the national average. The data, from the California Homeless Youth Project and available only on kidsdata.org, are sorted by county, school district and legislative district. The data include information by grade level and nighttime residence.

In this webinar, you’ll learn more about this important new dataset and how to use it in your work.

Presenters include:

Shahera Hyatt, MSW, Project Director, California Homeless Youth Project
See presentation

Patricia Julianelle, JD, Director of State Projects and Legal Affairs, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth
See presentation

Regan Foust, PhD, Data Manager, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health

Brenda Dowdy, Homeless Education Program Specialist, San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools

Sign up for announcements of upcoming webinars, data alerts and other news from kidsdata.org.

Questions? Email us at info@lpfch.org.

 

RELATED CONTENT:

See the data:

Homeless Public School Students

by Grade Level

by Nighttime Residence

by Legislative District

Learn more about the scope of student homelessness:

Issue Brief: California’s Homeless Students: A Growing Population (PDF)
California Homeless Youth Project

Posted by Barbara Feder Ostrov

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WEBINAR: Using Student Homelessness Data to Advocate on Behalf of Children and Families

homelessness-webinar

Tuesday, November 18, 2014
10 a.m. to 11 a.m. PST

If you work on behalf of children and families who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless, this one-hour webinar is for you.

The story of California’s homeless students is largely a hidden one—many are doubled up with family and friends, while others live in shelters.

New data, however, show the extent of homelessness of California’s pre-K-12 students enrolled in public schools. Nearly 270,000 public school students in the state were homeless at some point in the 2012-2013 school year. That equates to about 4% of all California’s public school students, double the national average. The data, from the California Homeless Youth Project and available only on kidsdata.org, are sorted by county, school district and legislative district. The data include information by grade level and nighttime residence.

In this webinar, you’ll learn more about this important new dataset and how to use it in your work.

REGISTER NOW>>

Who should participate:

Anyone who works on children’s issues related to poverty and homelessness: legislative staffers, grant writers, educators, advocates, policy analysts, health providers, consultants, communications professionals and others.

Presenters:

Shahera Hyatt, MSW, Project Director, California Homeless Youth Project

Patricia Julianelle, JD, Director of State Projects and Legal Affairs, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth

Regan Foust, PhD, Data Manager, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health

Brenda Dowdy, Homeless Education Program Specialist, San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools

Can’t attend? Don’t worry! The session will be recorded and posted on the foundation’s website after the webinar.

Questions? Email info@lpfch.org.

 

RELATED CONTENT

See the data:

Learn more about the scope of student homelessness:

Issue Brief: California’s Homeless Students: A Growing Population (PDF)
California Homeless Youth Project

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New Study of California’s Latino Children Finds Striking Differences in Health and Well-being Within This 4.7 Million-and-Growing Population

Latino Health Report

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Full Report
Press Release
Press Release (Spanish)

A comprehensive new study of California’s Latino children paints a complex picture of their health and well-being—and finds striking differences within a 4.7 million-strong population that comprises more than half of all the children in the state.

More than 94% of these children were born in the United States. And while many Latino children live in poverty, are uninsured and have higher rates of obesity than their white counterparts, Latino children have comparable access to preventive health care and most of their parents report them as being in “good” or “excellent” health.

However, the researchers also found that children living in “linguistically isolated” families, where Spanish is primarily spoken, face far greater challenges in health access and educational achievement compared to children in families where both English and Spanish are spoken.

See the full study>>

The study was conducted by researchers from the university-based Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative and commissioned by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health. The researchers examined data on physical health, as well as on family, school and neighborhood environments, to create a picture of the current status of Latino children in the state.

The study is intended to provide data for policymakers and advocates working both to improve the current health and well-being of Latino children and to ensure a healthy future population for California.

“Health is such a critical component of future success for California’s Latino children. If they don’t achieve their full potential, it will be a terrible economic burden for the state,” said Dr. Fernando Mendoza, professor of pediatrics at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and one of the health experts consulted for the study. “This study shows the need to develop policies that improve access to health care, address language and cultural barriers to better health, and ameliorate the harmful health effects caused by poverty.”

The California findings are largely consistent with those of a recently released national study of Latino children, which noted lower rates of health insurance among Latino children compared to white children and raised concerns about persistent health disparities, but also highlighted solid gains in educational achievement.

Related Content:

Kidsdata.org: Data on Latino/Hispanic Children in California, by County, School District and Legislative District

Posted by Barbara Feder Ostrov

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Quick Survey: Help Us Improve Kidsdata.org!

Survey

Kidsdata.org users, we need your help!

Please take this very quick survey about how you use kidsdata.

We’re interested in your ideas on how to make the site an even more useful resource, and we especially would like to know how you’ve used kidsdata to improve the lives of children and families. Your example could be featured in our Data in Action section or in a future blog post.

Take the survey>>

Thank you for your help.

Posted by Barbara Feder Ostrov

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Only on Kidsdata.org: New Data on California’s Homeless Students

HomelessYouthMapThe story of California’s homeless students is largely a hidden one—many are doubled up with family and friends, while others live in shelters.

New data available for the first time, however, show the extent of homelessness of California’s pre-K-12 students enrolled in public schools.

Nearly 270,000 public school students in Calif. were homeless at some point in the 2012-2013 school year. That equates to about 4% of all California’s public school students, double the national average. California accounted for just over one-fifth of all homeless public school students in the U.S. that school year.

The data released today come from a partnership between the California Homeless Youth Project and kidsdata.org. The data are sorted by county, school district and legislative district and are available only on kidsdata.org.

See the data:

Homeless Public School Students

Learn more about the scope of student homelessness:

Issue Brief: California’s Homeless Students: A Growing Population (PDF)
California Homeless Youth Project

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about California’s Homeless Students (PDF)

Press Release: California’s Homeless Students: Nearly 270,000 and Growing (PDF)

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Using Kidsdata.org in Education: California Schools Magazine

Use Kidsdata.org in Education

Kidsdata.org can be a boon for school boards and administrators navigating the complexities of Local Control Formula Funding, according to an article in the latest issue of California Schools magazine, published by the California School Boards Association.

For comprehensive data that can help officials to make sound decisions for schools’ Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs), writer Scott LaFee directs them to kidsdata.org and quotes noted technologist Clifford Stoll:

“The beauty of kidsdata, aside from the fact that it’s free, is how deeply it goes. You can look at subjects at the state, regional, county and district level. You can compare your district with others or with state averages. And the information is really quite involved. It includes factors like health, ethnicity and socioeconomics.”

You can read the article here.

RELATED CONTENT:

School Nurses: Still in Short Supply, But Earning Their Keep

In California’s Immigrant Families, Reading or Sharing Books with Children Less Common

ARCHIVED WEBINAR: The New Kidsdata.org: Putting Data to Work for California Children

Data in Your Pocket: Kidsdata.org Goes Mobile

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National Immunization Awareness Month: Data and Resources from Kidsdata.org

National_immunization_month_2014

Photo credit: Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr

California’s recent whooping cough epidemic (PDF) has added new resonance to nationwide public health campaigns for this August’s National Immunization Awareness Month.

Researchers have linked parents’ vaccine refusals to a higher risk of whooping cough in their children. In California, nearly 15,000 kindergartners were exempted from required school vaccinations in 2014 because of their parents’ personal beliefs, and the percentage of kindergartners with “personal belief exemptions” is on the rise.

In 2014, 90.2% of California kindergartners had all required immunizations before entering school, but percentages vary widely among counties.

Read on for the latest California immunization data from kidsdata.org and resources for observing National Immunization Awareness Month.

 

Data

This map shows kindergarten immunization levels in California:

To see a similar map for immunization exemptions, click here.

See more immunization data by county>>

 

Resources

National Immunization Awareness Month Toolkit, National Public Health Information Coalition

National Immunization Awareness Month Resources, American Academy of Pediatrics

National Immunization Awareness Month Resources, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

California Immunization Coalition

Child Trends: Immunization

Childhood Immunization: Medline Plus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Vaccines.gov, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services

Posted by Gabby Mujal

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