Carrying a Weapon Other Than a Gun at School, by Level of School Connectedness

(change indicator)
Download & Other Tools
Location: (hide)

Loading...

Year(s): (edit)

Loading...

Data Type: (edit)

Loading...

Loading... (edit)

Loading...

Select All Counties
Alameda County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Alpine County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Amador County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Butte County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Calaveras County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Colusa County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Contra Costa County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Del Norte County
School Districts
Select All Districts
El Dorado County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Fresno County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Glenn County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Humboldt County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Imperial County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Inyo County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Kern County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Kings County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Lake County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Lassen County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Los Angeles County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Madera County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Marin County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Mariposa County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Mendocino County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Merced County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Modoc County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Mono County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Monterey County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Napa County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Nevada County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Orange County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Placer County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Plumas County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Riverside County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Sacramento County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Benito County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Bernardino County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Diego County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Francisco County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Joaquin County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Luis Obispo County
School Districts
Select All Districts
San Mateo County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Santa Barbara County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Santa Clara County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Santa Cruz County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Shasta County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Siskiyou County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Solano County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Sonoma County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Stanislaus County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Sutter County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Tehama County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Trinity County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Tulare County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Tuolumne County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Ventura County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Yolo County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Yuba County
School Districts
Select All Districts
Loading…
(Return to top)

Learn More About School Safety

Measures of School Safety on Kidsdata.org
On kidsdata.org, indicators of school safety are based on student reports regarding:

Also available are data from school staff on the extent to which:
Data based on student reports are available by grade level (7, 9, 11, and/or non-traditional), gender, level of school connectedness,* parent education level, and sexual orientation.

*Levels of school connectedness are based on a scale created from responses to five questions about feeling safe, close to people, and a part of school, being happy at school, and about teachers treating students fairly.
School Safety
Bullying and Harassment at School
Disconnected Youth
Pupil Support Services
Juvenile Arrests
Gang Involvement
School Attendance and Discipline
School Climate
Why This Topic Is Important
The safety and supportiveness of children’s school environments play a crucial role in their development and academic success. When students feel safe and supported at school, they tend to have better school attendance and test scores, and they are less likely to engage in risky behaviors such as substance abuse and violence (1). Exposure to violence at school is associated with many negative outcomes for students, including depression, suicide, substance use, truancy, academic problems, and violent behavior (2, 3). The fear of violence alone can affect students’ development, concentration, and ability to learn (4).

School safety often is compromised by bullying and harassment, which affects more than a quarter of U.S. middle and high school students each year (5). In addition to the risk of physical injury, victims of bullying are at increased risk for emotional and physical health problems, as well as poor academic achievement (5). Any young person can be bullied, but certain groups are more likely to be victimized, such as LGBTQ youth, students with disabilities, and African American/black youth (5).
For more information on school safety, see kidsdata.org’s Research & Links section. Also see kidsdata.org’s topics on Bullying and Harassment at School and School Climate.

Sources for this narrative:

1.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (n.d.). School connectedness. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/protective/school_connectedness.htm

2.  National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2016). Understanding school violence: Fact sheet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/school_violence_fact_sheet-a.pdf

3.  National Institute of Justice. (n.d.). School crime and safety. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. Retrieved from: https://www.nij.gov/topics/crime/school-crime/Pages/welcome.aspx

4.  Austin, G., et al. (2013). Guidebook to the California Healthy Kids Survey, part II: Survey content – core module, 2013-14 edition. WestEd. Retrieved from: https://data.calschls.org/resources/chks_guidebook_2_coremodules.pdf

5.  American Educational Research Association. (2013). Prevention of bullying in schools, colleges, and universities: Research report and recommendations. Retrieved from: http://www.aera.net/Publications/Books/PreventionofBullying/tabid/14872/Default.aspx
How Children Are Faring
According to 2013-2015 estimates, less than a quarter of California public school students in grades 7, 9, 11, and non-traditional programs felt very safe at school. Overall, boys were more likely to feel very safe at school than their female counterparts, as were students whose parents had higher levels of education. Among racial/ethnic groups with data, 23% of white youth statewide felt very safe at school, compared with 16% of their Asian peers. Estimates of feeling very unsafe at school were highest for American Indian/Alaska Native youth, at 6%.

Across measures, it is more common for gay, lesbian, and bisexual students and those with low levels of school connectedness to feel unsafe, fear victimization, and engage in violence-related risk behaviors when compared with other youth. For example, in 2013-2015, the percentage of gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth who on four or more occasions in the previous year were afraid of being beaten up at school was 8%, compared with 3% of straight youth. In the same period, an estimated 8% of students with low school connectedness were in four or more physical fights in the previous year, compared with 1% of students with high levels of connectedness.

Statewide in 2013-2015, an estimated 5% of students in non-traditional programs carried a gun at school at least once in the previous year, and 18% carried another type of weapon at least once. By comparison, 2% of students in traditional 11th grade carried a gun and 6% carried another type of weapon at school in the previous year. Across all student groups, less than 10% of youth carried a gun at school in the previous year and less than 20% carried a weapon other than a gun.
Policy Implications
When students are exposed to violence or feel unsafe at school, it affects their academic performance and can negatively impact their health and well being (1, 2). Efforts to improve school safety should include creating positive school climates, strengthening youth mental health services, improving school discipline policies, and supporting evidence-based family and community violence prevention programs (1, 3). Strategies to improve school safety also should address bullying and harassment, which is a pervasive problem affecting the safety of millions of students nationwide (4).

Policy options that could strengthen school safety include:
  • Ensuring that schools engage families and community partners to create positive school climates, which are linked to lower rates of violence and bullying, increased feelings of safety among students and staff, and other positive outcomes; such efforts should involve ongoing staff training, strategies to promote pro-social student behavior, and tiered systems of support to meet student needs (5, 6)
  • Supporting family- and school-based programs that strengthen communication and help all students build social-emotional skills including teamwork, problem solving, and conflict resolution (3, 5, 6, 7)
  • Expanding the workforce of qualified mental health professionals serving youth, such as school counselors and psychiatrists, and ensuring adequate training for school staff to recognize signs of emotional or behavioral problems and refer students to appropriate services (8)
  • Engaging all school stakeholders—leaders, teachers, students, families, community organizations, and others—in developing and disseminating shared codes of conduct, school policies, anti-bullying statements, and bullying reporting systems; these should pay particular attention to vulnerable populations (e.g., LGBTQ youth) and include training on how to deal with bullying incidents (4, 7)
  • Implementing non-punitive school discipline policies that are clear, fair, consistent, and promote a positive learning environment; such policies should be based on a tiered system of appropriate responses to misconduct that keep students in school when possible, and should include clear, equitable classroom behavior management practice (5, 6)
  • Promoting comprehensive violence prevention strategies that are evidence-based, data-driven, tailored to the community, and led by cross-sector coalitions (1, 3, 7)
For more policy ideas and information, see kidsdata.org's Research & Links section. Also see Policy Implications under these kidsdata.org topics: School Climate, Bullying and Harassment at School, School Attendance and Discipline, and Children's Emotional Health.

Sources for this narrative:

1.  David-Ferdon, C., et al. (2016). A comprehensive technical package for the prevention of youth violence and associated risk behavior. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/yv-technicalpackage.pdf

2.  Austin, G., et al. (2013). Guidebook to the California Healthy Kids Survey, part II: Survey content – core module, 2013-14 edition. WestEd. Retrieved from: https://data.calschls.org/resources/chks_guidebook_2_coremodules.pdf

3.  National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2016). Understanding school violence: Fact sheet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/school_violence_fact_sheet-a.pdf

4.  American Educational Research Association. (2013). Prevention of bullying in schools, colleges, and universities: Research report and recommendations. Retrieved from: http://www.aera.net/Publications/Books/PreventionofBullying/tabid/14872/Default.aspx

5.  Morgan, E., et al. (2014). The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Council of State Governments Justice Center. Retrieved from: http://csgjusticecenter.org/youth/school-discipline-consensus-report

6.  U.S. Department of Education. (2014). Guiding principles: A resource guide for improving school climate and discipline. Retrieved from: https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/guiding-principles.pdf

7.  David-Ferdon, C., & Simon, T. R. (2014). Preventing youth violence: Opportunities for action. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/pdf/opportunities-for-action.pdf

8.  Murphey, D., et al. (2014). Are the children well? A model and recommendations for promoting the mental wellness of the nation’s young people. Child Trends & Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved from: http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2014/07/are-the-children-well-.html
Websites with Related Information
Key Reports and Research
County/Regional Reports
More Data Sources For School Safety